Who's the Baketard?

Why Baketard? Love to cook, hate to bake. Despite having gone to cooking school and working in some top kitchens, I never learned the baking side of things. I'm building my baking and photography skills, while sharing recipes that rock my world in the mean time.

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Entries in barbecue (3)

Monday
Jul292013

Grilled Pork and Chorizo Burgers

Summer! SUN! A real summer in Seattle. YAYYYYYYY!!

This summer has been gorgeous, which is something we have lamented not having the past few years in Seattle. Because of the great weather, ours has been a crazy calendar of get-togethers and cookouts, so I haven’t taken much time for actually typing in recipes for the blog. These burgers were so completely amazing, I couldn’t NOT share them.

Until now, I always thought the Lambgasm burgers were the best burgers I’ve ever tried. They’re great. They’re even amazing. These are better. They are adapted from Suzanne Goin's Sunday Suppers at Lucques: Seasonal Recipes from Market to Table, which is one of my favorite books in my cookbook collection. I can honestly say I've made over half the recipes in the book and haven't been disappointed with a single one!  (FYI, She has a new book coming out in the fall from her Wine Bar in LA, The A.O.C. Cookbook and you KNOW I've pre-ordered THAT action. If it's even half of what her original book is, it will be a keeper.

Ok, to the details--Adding the aromatics and bacon inside the burger is one thing, throwing in chorizo is another. Add the atomic romesco and homemade aioli takes it to the next level. To be fair, her recipe for romesco is pretty smooth and not too brutally hot, but I ran out of anchos and the only chiles in the house were a package I found of shredded, dried chiles from Hunan I’d brought back from an asia trip. I followed the instructions below for the romesco, subbing these in. The romesco still tasted like what I expected a romesco to be—it just had an afterburn which pretty much guaranteed we’d be sitting on a sno-cone for the next three days. We powered through anyway.

A few more modifications: 

I added caramelized onions as a topping, because HELLO—what’s better than caramelized onions?

Seriously, what is?

I also subbed in cheap grocery store potato buns for the brioche buns, because while I like brioche in many things, BRIOCHE BUNS ARE BULLSHIT. You end up with such a huge-assed bun, and everything else gets lost. Give me a butter-toasted cheapassed grocery store bun ANY day over the fussy, hoity-toidy brioche bun.

I used aged new Zealand cheddar, pecorino-romano, beer and sodium citrate to make Modernist Cuisine at Home processed cheese. Made with all cheese, but rubbery-melty-good like Velveeta. You can find recipes for this all over the place. While it’s not critical for this recipe, it rounded out all the flavors really well.

Finally, this recipe calls for 2 pounds of pork and a quarter pound of chorizo. Where the hell are you going to find a quarter pound of chorizo? I bought a package of ¾ pound and just threw it all in. It was delicious.

Suzanne Goin says to serve this with a vinegary coleslaw. We did it with a spicy potato salad and the Zucchini and Curried Breadcrumb Tian from last week’s NYT.

Sno-cone anyone?

Suzanne Goin’s Grilled Pork Burgers

Makes 6 burgers

For the burger:

  • ·         1 ½ teaspoon cumin seeds
  • ·         3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for grilling
  • ·         ½ cup diced shallots
  • ·         1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • ·         1 tablespoon thyme leaves
  • ·         2 chiles de arbol, thinly sliced on the bias
  • ·         2 pounds ground pork
  • ·         ¼ pound fresh Mexican chorizo, casing removed
  • ·         3 ounces applewood-smoked bacon, finely diced
  • ·         2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • ·         6 slices Manchego cheese
  • ·         6 brioche buns or other good burger buns
  • ·         Aioli (recipe follows)
  • ·         Romesco (recipe follows)
  • ·         2 ounces arugula
  • ·         Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  1. In a medium sauté pan, toast the cumin seeds over medium heat a few minutes until the seeds release their aroma and darken slightly. Pound the seeds in a mortar or spice grinder until coarsely ground.
  2. Return the pan to the stove over high heat for 1 minutes. Add the olive oil and shallots. Turn the heat down to medium-low, and cook for a few minutes, sitrring, once or twice, until the shallots start to soften. Add the garlic, thyme, cumin and sliced chile. Season with 1/4 teaspoon salt and a few grindings of black peppery, and cook 3 to 4 minutes, until the shallots become translucent. Set aside to cool.
  3. In a large bowl, use your hands to combine the ground pork, chorizo, bacon, shallot mixture, and parsley, being careful not to overmix the meat. Season with 1 1/4 teaspoons salt and lots of freshly ground black pepper. Shape the meat into six 6-ounce patties. Chill in the refrigerator if not using right away.
  4. Light the grill 30 to 40 minutes before cooking and remove pork burgers from the refrigerator to come to room temperature (if you made them in advance).
  5. When the coals are broken down, red, and glowing, brush the pork burgers with olive oil and grill them 3 to 4 minutes on the first side, until they're nicely browned. Turn the burgers over, and place a piece of cheese on each one. Cook another 3 minutes or so, until the pork is cooked through. (It should still be slightly pink in the center.)
  6. Slice the buns in half, brush them with olive oil, and toast them on the grill, cut side down, for a minute or so, until they're lightly browned.
  7. Spread both sides of the buns and the aioli. Place a burger on the bottom half of each bun, and dollop with a generous amount of romesco. Place some arugula leaves on top, and finish with the top half of the bun.

For the aioli and the romesco:

  • ·         1 extra-large egg yolk
  • ·         ¼ cup grapeseed oil
  • ·         ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • ·         1 small clove garlic
  • ·         ¼ lemon, for juicing
  • ·         Pinch cayenne pepper
  • ·         Kosher salt
  • ·         5 ancho chiles
  • ·         2 tablespoons raw almonds
  • ·         2 tablespoons blanched hazelnuts
  • ·         1 ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • ·         1 slice country bread, about 1-inch thick
  • ·         1/3 cup San Marzano canned tomatoes
  • ·         1 clove garlic, chopped
  • ·         1 tablespoon chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • ·         1/2 lemon, for juicing
  • ·         Kosher salt
  1. For the aioli: Place the yolk in a stainless steel bowl. Begin whisking in the grapeseed oil drop by drop. Once the mixture has thickened and emulsified, you can whisk in the remaining grapeseed and olive oils in a slow steady stream. If the mixture gets too thick, add a drop or two of water.
  2. Pound the garlic with 1/4 teaspoon salt with a mortar and pestle. Whisk the garlic paste into the aioli. Season with 1/4 teaspoon salt, a squeeze of lemon juice, and the cayenne. Taste for balance and seasoning. If the aioli seems thick and gloppy, thin it with a little water. In addition to thinning the aioli, this will also make it creamier.
  3. For romesco: Preheat the oven to 375° F. Remove and discard the stems and seeds from the chiles, and then soak them in warm water for 15 minutes to soften. Strain the chiles, and pat dry with paper towels.
  4. Meanwhile, spread the nuts on a baking sheet and toast for 8 to 10 minutes, until they smell nutty and are golden brown.
  5. Heat a large sauté pan over high heat for 2 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons olive oil and wait a minute. Fry the slice of bread on both sides until golden brown. Remove the bread from the pan and cool. Cut it into 1-inch cubes and set aside.
  6. Return the pan to the stove over high heat. Add 2 tablespoons olive oil and the chiles and sauté for a minute or two. Add the tomatoes. Season with 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook 2 to 3 minutes, stirring often, until the tomato juices have evaporated and the tomato starts to color slightly. Turn off the heat, and leave the mixture in the pan.
  7. In a food processor, pulse together the toasted nuts, garlic, and fried bread until the bread and nuts are coarsely ground. Add the chile-tomato mixture and process for a minute more.
  8. With the machine running, slowly pour in the remaining 1 cup olive oil and process until you have a smooth purée. Don't worry, the romesco will "break" or separate into solids and oil; this is normal. Add the parsley, and season to taste with lemon juice and more salt if you like.
Friday
Apr132012

Grilled Asparagus with Hazelnut Aioli and Pinot Noir Syrup

With the weather hitting 70-degrees this week (What? In Seattle? Are you insane?), teasing us with the summer we’re unlikely to get until the middle of July, I’m sick of this winter comfort food bullshit. I want morels, asparagus, outdoor drunken barbecues…and a pony. 

One of my favorite grill recipes (and absolutely my favorite asparagus recipe) is this one. Smoky grilled asparagus, rich and creamy hazelnut aioli and a tart, sweet pinot syrup. There are a million variations on this recipe today, but this is the one to which I always return.  

Yes, there are a couple of sub-recipes. Wah. They're EASY. Everything can be done well in advance, making this a perfect add to the menu when your drunk ass decides to go outside, take a chance on the sun sticking around for a few more minutes, and fire up the grill. (You can do it in a grill pan too, but that’s just douchey.)

You’re gonna love this one!

BTW, Thanks to Jackie Baisa for delaying the shoveling of asparagus into her yawning maw long enough to take the pretty pictures for me!

Grilled Asparagus with Hazelnut Aioli and Pinot Noir Syrup

Ingredients:

2 bunches asparagus, stems snapped to where tender and cleaned

3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Kosher salt to taste

Hazelnut Aioli (recipe follows)

Pinot Noir Syrup (recipe follows)

Preparation:

Toss asparagus in olive oil and salt to taste.  Place on well-heated grill and cook until just tender, about 3-6 minutes, depending on heat.  Place in serving bowl or individual plates.  Drizzle with Hazelnut Aioli and Pinot Noir Syrup.

For the Hazelnut Aioli:

1 shallot, minced

1 Tbsp whole grain mustard

1 Tbsp lemon juice

3 Tbsp sherry vinegar

2 oz hazelnut oil

3 oz olive oil

Salt, to taste

Hazelnuts, toasted, finely chopped, to taste

Vinaigrette will easily emulsify, so this may be made in a food processor or vigorously by hand.  Finish the sauce with finely chopped toasted hazelnuts, saving some to put over the top of asparagus when plated.

For the Pinot Noir Syrup:

1 bottle Pinot Noir, or your favorite red varietal (Note: I used my favorite local Syrah, and it was superb)

5 Tbsp sugar, preferably organic

In a heavy bottomed saucepan, melt sugar.  When sugar begins to turn golden, add wine.  Cook down on medium heat until syrupy.  This should take 10 minutes or so, depending on heat.  Turn sauce down when it begins to thicken because it goes very quickly from that point on.  Let cool and reserve.  This is good indefinitely.  Do not refrigerate.

 

Friday
Jul222011

3 Chicks One Plate

This post is about Fried Chicken. What did you THINK it was about? Sickos. 

I loooooooves me some fried chicken. It seems like everyone does, and everyone has their own special way of making it. It’s one of those things like meat loaf, where we all have that nostalgia factor going on when we eat it, and usually the best version is the one we remember from way back, or the one mom taught us to cook. 

My mom made amazing fried chicken, and it always included mashed potatoes, corn, and cream gravy. For whatever reason, I don’t ever make it the way she did though. (Probably because my gravy never tastes as good as hers did.) When I make fried chicken, I follow my friend Clara’s lead. Clara is an amazing cook who does a ton of delicious Asian dishes. Her fried chicken drumettes are what bring all the boys to her front yard. They’re simple, crispy, sweet and salty. I can spend days slaving over an elaborate menu for friends and I guarantee you, the recipe they’ll clamor for are these drumettes. It never ceases to make me grind my teeth and shake my fist in the air, but I get it. They’re delicious. Because I’m a giver, I’m sharing them with you along with my favorite Korean fried chicken recipe (taken from Australian Gourmet Traveller, my favorite cooking magazine) and one done with my favorite barbecue sauce, modified from the recipe I use for Oola’s Crispy Fried Ribs. My partner David pointed out that I would be remiss not to acknowledge him having to stand in the driveway cooking batch after batch of drumettes in the turkey fryer for the 4th of July. Thanks, honey!

Enjoy! Betcha can’t eat just one…. 

Ingredients

Fried Chicken Drumettes:

48 Chicken Drumettes or Wings

2 cups cornstarch

Canola oil, for frying 

Clara’s Magic Drumette Sauce:

2 cups soy sauce

¾ cup sugar

1/8 cup dried chili flakes

¼ cup garlic, peeled and chopped

¼ cup ginger, peeled and chopped 

Korean Fried Chicken Chile Sauce:

¼ cup gochujang (Note from Marc-You can find this in any Asian market. If you can’t find this ingredient, a good substitution is not to make it at all—quit your bitching. This isn’t Sandra Lee and sometimes you cant get by subbing in a cup of ketchup or hiding it under some frozen tater tots.)

3/4 cup gochujang

2 tbsp each soy sauce and rice vinegar

1 tbsp honey

2 tsp sesame oil

2 tsp sugar

2 tsp ginger (about 1” piece), finely grated

1  garlic clove, finely chopped 

Modified Oola Sauce:

6 large garlic cloves, minced

1/2  cup sliced fresh ginger plus 1/4 cup minced (6 ounces total)

6 scallions, thinly sliced, white and green parts separated

1 1/2 cups soy sauce

1/4 cup coarsely chopped cilantro                  

1/4 cup vegetable oil

2 cups lightly packed brown sugar

1 cup ketchup

1 teaspoon crushed red pepper

1/4 cup cider vinegar

1/8 cup toasted, ground Sichuan peppercorns (optional…I like the tongue numbing, citrusy smack this adds to the sauce) 

Preparation:

For Clara’s Magic Sauce:

  1. Put soy sauce and sugar in a small saucepan and heat over low heat until sugar has dissolved and incorporated into the soy. Add remaining ingredients and reduce sauce by 1/3. Do this slowly, as the soy sauce will burn and turn bitter if you boil it too vigorously.

For Korean Sauce:

  1. Combine ingredients in a large bowl, season to taste with freshly ground pepper and set aside.

For the Oola Sauce:

  1. In a large saucepan, heat 1/4 cup of the vegetable oil. Add the minced garlic and ginger and the scallion greens and cook over moderately high heat, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add soy sauce, the brown sugar, ketchup and crushed red pepper and bring to a boil. Add vinegar and Sichuan peppercorn, if using. Cook over moderately high heat for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and add the chopped cilantro. Transfer the rib sauce to a large bowl.

For the Chicken:

  1. Put the cornstarch in a large freezer bag and add the drumettes. Seal and shake to ensure all of the drumettes are well covered by the cornstarch.
  2. Heat oil to 350 degrees Farenheit. Cook the drumettes in batches in the hot oil, cooking until the chicken turns golden brown, about 8-10 minutes per batch. It is critical that you let the oil return to 350 degrees before you add the next batch.
  3. Place chicken on a baking sheet lined with paper towels to drain. (Note: As counter-intuitive as it seems you can fry the chicken earlier in the day and even freeze the pieces (once cooled) individually on a sheet pan and transfer to a freezer bag. Just before serving, put the chicken on a sheet pan and blast in a high oven (425-450 degrees) until brown and sizzling, about 8 minutes. You wont be able to tell these didn’t just come out of the hot oil. If you’re planning to do this, cook the chicken in your initial batch a couple of minutes less than you would if you were serving it right away.)
  4. Divide the chicken and dredge in Clara’s Magic Sauce or the Oola Sauce. For the Korean Fried Chicken, toss the chicken in a large bowl with the chile sauce mixture. Garnish with sliced scallions.
  5. Stand back. Your guests will eat the fuck out of this chicken and you dont want to get in their way.